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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside from his presidency 10 years as secretary of state, senator, congressman administered six countries. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i will start with a fairly simple question. was very moment when he said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed there was. it took place a couple years ago when i ran out of ideas for any more books on the founding fathers. others have written on washington, jefferson, madison and i had written on patrick henry, james monroe, john hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's pulitzer prize-winning book, profiles in courage and daring chapter one was john quincy adams. so i thought his name begins begins with a comma on the season chapter one. but i was not the reason. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of coverage and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:00am EST
was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a center f
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
, equivalent to three of those shelf over there. obviously, the diaries and writings of john adams, the writings of john adams are, i think, seven volumes, and the diaries are four volumes. the writings of sam ad. adams, and thomas hutchenson, all prolific writers, kept diaries issue and kept all the correspondence so it's a rich pool of research. yes, sir? >> all this information disclosed, why was it dormant for so long? >> well, it's not dormant, it's there in bits and pieces, and the problem with american history -- i think i can generalize all american history, but certainly, the history of the colonial, revolutionary war and post revolutionary war era is that it's very complex, and as my son, at 14, came home from school and said, you know, something, dad, american history, all they do is talk. there's not a lot of action. all they do is talk. well, he's right, and the talk is very complex on very, very complex issues that my philosops and political philosophers debated for many, many years. this involved enormously important cop sents that had implications for the entire world, t
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
his chest and is as accurate as the interstate. on the fair site at one point, those from john adams and benjamin harrison to cotton and the congress delegate were sent to the boston from philadelphia. they were brought by a young lawyer who was captured. the british got ahold of these documents and to publish them. the john adams letters are just so rude about the continental congress that they didn't have to change anything in them. prepare some others change it to make it look as if george washington was having an affair with a maid at a tavern. so yes, both sides were using propaganda within the newspapers. >> interestedly in the middle minolta were sold upon a few london, pools to report george washington had died in battle. normally these are also kind of the room are hearsay and their way of adding disclaimer was to print the the more gossipy news from less credible sources at the back of the newspaper. when the chronicle was any page newspaper ad that uses most commonly commonly found on page eight. >> these publishers are also in competition with each other, so they will challen
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm not sure what i have would have done. i can conceive that i would have been a delegate to the continental congress. i probably would not have been a military officer. to tell you the truth, i did not think about that much while i was writing it. i did have a sense of kinship to some of these people because they are trying to organize the idea of national realignments and a grand strategy. >> would you have been a loyal list? >> i wouldn't have been a low list, but the one part of my family that i can trace back to the revolution, i couldn't get to be in the sense of the revolution because my mother's family were loyalists in pennsylvania. there
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:45pm EST
support from no less a person than john quincy adams. former president at that time, he was a congressman who represented the 36 survivors for the united states supreme court and won a dramatic victory. declaring them illegally enslaved and therefore free, enabling them to return to their native land. which they did a month later in november of 1841. he returned to southern sierra leone, taking with them a group of missionaries. this is the organization of the american missionary association. they created the monday mission. we have an image of the ship itself? well, the amistad, in the moment it depicts, is a meeting with a group of white hunters on the northern end of long island. you can actually see them here. yes, this is the amistad. in the background, this is the naval vessel. it is on the way capture. this probably produced by an abolitionist artist. sometime after the actual board. so what we have here is a very important case in the struggle against slavery. important because it was a victory. this kind of thing was not common. the institution of slavery was extremel
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
very vivid phrase. john adams in the same r rah, the same years said that jefferson's mind is poisoned with passion, prejudice and faction. hamilton said of jefferson -- this is how well the washington people worked -- hamilton said of jefferson that anyone who cares about the liberty of the country or welfare of the nation should look with great despair upon jefferson's ascendance to the presidency. and jefferson, in a, with a fairly formidable outreach to his friend said i will not suffer the slanders of a man whose history from the moment at which history can stoop to notice him is a tissue of machinations against the liberty of the country which is not only -- which has not only received him and given him bread, but heaped its honors on his head. hamilton responded by saying jefferson was a fanatic in politics and an atheist in religion, and anonymous letter writer once wrote: i think you ought to get a damn kicking, you redheaded son of a bitch. [laughter] so i know, i know karl rove wants to think he invented all of this, but -- [laughter] we've been, we've been fighting these ba
Comedy Central
Dec 19, 2012 10:30am PST
the. >> swing and a miss, swing and a miss on that one. larry feins from the three stooges. >> john adams, our second president. >> okay. the fun interactive set, you sit next to him in a chair. >> incredible. what other technology do you have. >> our 8th president. >> our first president with ironic faition hair. >> this is worth the price of admission right here just to pet his face. >> who is this. >> martin van burren. >> and this man, i did not realize we elected vampire to the senate. >> we didn't. this is william henry harrison. john tyler, 10th president had the most children, would you like to guess how many. >> 425. >> 14. >> 14. all right. who is this? >> our 18th president you lisses s grant. >> what does the s stand for. >> that's a great question. >> thank you. >> this doesn't seem fair. why does fdr get to sit down. >> i can lick him. >> you cannot. >> we're wearing almost the compaq same suit and tie t would be like licking myself. >> something i've also dreamed of doing. >> that i don't mind but not ronald reagan. >> i don't mind it either but all the hot-- isn't br
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the income then-president, that year john f. kennedy and his wife, there are leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing -- another thing that takes place on inauguration morning, and this will happen again coming is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago just hal
FOX
Dec 14, 2012 9:00am PST
jamie, this is jannelle and john adams, their three kids. the one that's gone viral. >> kind of how everybody feels during the holiday season. >> to tell us more about it, we have "the addams family" via skype "right this minute." what happened? why are they crying? >> she started crying, holding the o, flipping it, showing the tag on the o. i told her dad to give it backwards so when she did flip it, it would be the right way. so she tried using reverse psychology and telling her not to flip it the right way. i think he kind of scared her when he said it, which made her cry and made the boys cry. >> why were you crying? what's your story. >> because. >> when you guys saw that picture, were you disappointed at first or did you see the humor right away. >> we saw the picture while we were taking the picture. we were laughing. >> do you see the humor now. >> we don't see the humor. >> joy to you all. >> say happy holiday. >> happy holiday. >> we also have the photographer that got this shot. >> so you didn't get any smiling pictures with the letters joy. you just got this one magic mo
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am EST
running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know about this, where would you have fit back in those days? what would you have been? >> i probably would've been a trouble maker, because that was one of my major things when i was involved in politics. but i probably also would've been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm not sure what i would've done. i can conceive of myself being a delegate to the continental congress or something. it's not hard for me to imagine myself in that role. i certainly would not have been -- probably would not have been a military officer. to tell you the truth, brian, i never thought about that much while i was right thing. i have a sense of kinship to these people, some of them, because they are trying to organize national realignment and the grand strategy. but not from a military standpoint. >> would you been loyalist? >> i would not been a loyalist. oddly enough, the one pa
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm EST
adams was such a revolutionary leader and so was his cousin john. can you tell us about the different styles of leadership and the different approaches to the issues of the day or how they thought the movement should go forward towards independence? >> the truth is it was a lull easier for john adams because of what sam adams had done before him, and sam adams had been called by a number of people the actual father of the country because he was the chief spokesperson and policymaker for the sons of liberty. the sons of liberty is the form of separate cells of radical people opposed to the british by the surgeon revolution necessary that sprung up almost independently across the colonies in connecticut and new york and pennsylvania and south carolina. and sam adams became the chief letter writer and political strategist and the story is told that a neighbor that had walked by his apartment at his house at 2:00 in the morning with see the light in his study up there and know that his pan was going scribble scroll trying to lead towards independence but sam adams really was, and of cours
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
for rachel's honor. in 1824 jackson beats john quincy adams in the election. he wins the popular vote but the electoral college flips in the loses the popular vote. i'm speaking speaking of palm beach counties so you know about the scenarios. checks and wins the popular vote. he comes back in four years in 1828 in beats john quincy adams and in 1828 is probably the second nastiest election in american history. of course with this current one being the nastiest with a negative ads and such. there's no love lost -- loss. jackson supporters don't call john quincy adams your excellency. they call him your fraudulent seat. they call jackson a white thief and his wife a of tennessee sohtz is huge scandal to the point that rachel donaldson jackson becomes increasingly religious every passing year. to the point where now all of the scandal about her really affecting her mental health and physical health. she is hoping and praying that jackson does not win, that she doesn't have to go to the white house sewer scandal becomes a national story. she is hoping and writing letters. she doesn't
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00am EST
quotations, especially from john adams, who makes it clear that they're not trying to create a situation where individuals who didn't like the federal government, could go hold up with an arsenal somewhere, hold off the feds when they came -- >> host: some people talk that way today. >> guest: that's not the way the founders thought. they saw this strictly as a mean of preserving the state's abilities to keep their militias going and in place, and john adams says at one point, that the militia is always subservient to the state. >> host: it's well-regulated. even after the constitution is adopted and washington is in office. you have the whiskey tax and the whiskey rebellion. how did they respond to that? >> that went better. sure. they recognized that they needed a strong federal power, needed to be -- needed to be these checks that would ensure that the states kept powers as well. >> host: over time, then, during the 1800s, the rest of the 1800s, we can -- 1900s, continue to have guns play a role in society, particularly ton the frontier, any surprises studying that era. >> t
MSNBC
Nov 30, 2012 11:00pm PST
did for john adams. >> i hope so. >> david eisenhower, evan thomas, the new book is called and this bluff reinforced a status quo. it was invoked in berlin. where the apples have fallen. >> i get the point. i think about ike, i think about him as humble and how can a guy from kansas be where i am at right now and some things i really think are great about that guy and you're doing what david did for john adams. >> i hope so. >> david eisenhower, evan thomas, the new book is called "ike's bluff." post world war ii history, it's the best. anyway, we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] we all make bad decisions. like say, gas station sushi. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pretty sketchy. ♪ and then there are the good decisions. like esurance. their coverage counselor tool helps you choose the right coverage for you at a great price. [ stomach growls ] without feeling queasy. that's insurance for the modern world. esurance. now backed by allstate. click or call. >>> let me finish tonight with thi
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 9:00pm EST
from john adams who makes it clear they were not trying to create a situation where individuals who didn't like the federal government could hold up an arsenal somewhere and hold off. that's not the way the founders saw. they saw this starkly as a means of preserving the state to keep their militias. john adams says at one point that the militia is always subservient to the state. it's not a rebellious -- >> host: it's a well regulated and something that ties into the said that even after the constitution is adopted in washington is an office, you have the whiskey tax and the whiskey rebellion. how did they respond to that? >> guest: that went better than fever billion did. but, they recognized the need strong federal government the need to be these checks that would ensure that the states kept power as well. >> host: over time than during the 1800's were the rest of the 1800's, the -- during the 1900's we continue to have guns play a role in the society particularly in the frontier any surprises that he founded study in that era? >> guest: the means of price to me is gun control in
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00pm EST
, especially from john adams, who makes it clear that they were not trying to create a situation where individuals who didn't like the federal government could go hold up an arsenal somewhere and hold off the feds when they came. >> host: some people talk like that today. >> guest: they do. it's not the way the guys, the founders, thought. they saw this strictly as a means of prereceiverring the -- preserving the state's abilities to keep their militias going in its place, and john adams says at one point that the militia is always subserve i can't to the state. it's not a rebellious -- >> host: well-regulated, ties into the governmental setup, and after the constitution is adopted in washington and you have the whisky tack -- tax and rebellion. how did they respond to that? >> guest: that went better than shay's rebellion did, but, sure. they recognized that they needed a strong federal power, but they needed to be checks that would ensure that the states kept powers as welt. >> host: over time, then, during 1800, the rest of the 1800s, we can -- 1900s, continue to have guns play a ro
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 2:00pm EST
, there's certain key leaders of the environmental movement. it's wonderful to see john adams who helped build nrdc for many years with gus and lisa who helped build the si yea rah club as well as we're sitting here in the afl-cio, certain members of the labor movement, joe worked in this building for 32 years and has built a group called now the labor network for sustainability. but some would argue that these two big movements, the environmental movement and the labor movement -- probably the two biggest movements in the united states over the past 30 years -- have different visions of the future. so i'm curious how much -- and i'd invite them and others, also, to come in on this, how much you think those two key institutions can embrace, first, your call for system change and whether you have seen spaces where their visions are converging. i thought we'd start with an easy question, gus. [laughter] >> well, thanks, john. well, as john and joe know, we are currently working together to launch an initiative that would try to further strengthen the links between the environmental
MSNBC
Dec 23, 2012 9:00am PST
coincidence, but john quincy adams, who was president at the time, thought it was a sign of divine benevolence, that somehow the fathers would be gathered up, the apotheosis of adams and jefferson on the 50th anniversary in 1826. and it is a little -- i mean, if you wrote that in a novel, you know, you'd kick it back and say a little too -- they're guilding the lily unquestionably. but i think it was also the beginning of our first moment of kind of founder chic that, you know, they died -- i think at that point there was only one remaining signer alive. there were very few. and so the fact that they were gone was a kind of mythological almost benediction to what they worked so hard for. and i think -- i wonder sometimes whether john adams would ultimately be pleased that he had to share the headline or think, you know, dammit, jefferson did it again, you know, he stepped on my story. bush 41, who is giving his wife rabbit ears. >> what is that? >> it was the rededication of the ford library. >> doing this. >> he's just loose. he's just loose and crazy. that picture also hangs in t
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:20pm EST
john adams lived, the shorter grew his creed. in the end, it was unitarianism. jefferson wrote those ringing words of the declaration, but jefferson was a utilitarian when he urged his nephew to inquire into the truth of christianity. "if it ends in a belief that there is no god, you'll find virtue in the comforts and pleasantness you feel in virtue's exercise." james madison always explained away religion as an innate appetite. the mind, he said, prefers the idea of the self existing clause to an infinite series of cause and effect. even the founders who were unbelievers considered it a civic duty in public service to be observant unbelievers. two days after jefferson wrote his famous letter endorsing a wall of separation between church and state, he attended church services in the house of representatives. services were also held at the treasury department. jefferson and other founders made statements like accommodations for the public's strong preference for religion to enjoy ample space in the public square. they understood that christianity fostered attitudes and aptitudes
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:30am EST
justice. the great chief justice, john marshall, had a great bit of luck. john adams wanted to appoint john jay who had been the first chief justice but had then gone off to be to have of new york. it was -- to be governor of new york. it was the time of the midnight judges, he needed a new chief justice. he says to john jay, come on and do this again. jay writes back, are you kidding? the supreme court's never going to amount to anything. [laughter] john adams as secretary of state brings that letter in to him, adams looks at the letter or, looks up at his secretary of state, john marshall, and says i guess i have to nominate you. [laughter] now, i'm not saying he wouldn't have been nominated if somebody else had brought in the letter, but it's certainly a possibility. [laughter] morrison, the list goes on and on. morrison waite, the most obscure chief justice, nominated by grant, the grant administration. corruption was rife. the first five nominees that grant, that tbrapt -- grant puts forward all seem to have been involved in some corrupt activity or another. finally grant
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover some things we are not going to see it coming inauguration in january because this time we do not have a change of power. as we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes. but nevertheless in the morning at inauguration when a president does the office come here is a 1961 dwight eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time, the incoming president that year, john f. kennedy and his wife jacqueline leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing that takes place on inauguration morning and this will happen is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago, just a half a block from where we were staying, there was this church called the first am church and that's where the services took place for america's f
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
-- keeps the presidency in 1800. you should take a gla glance at john adams. jefferson is versus madison what happened there. jefferson is evaluated and becomes the presidency the election for 1800 is excited. in some ways the most exciting election in american history because jefferson from aaron burr. the idea of burr from the united states. again, random things matter. this is why the argument of broader social forces is un-- if he becomes president it's hard to majtd whereabout. he doesn't and he doesn't because in large part people realize are ron burr is not someone they want near the white house. jefferson becomes president and jefferson the question is how much could matter? and if you look at the jefferson administration, historians are overwhelming the most important event of the jefferson administration was louisiana purchase. that's not surprising. if you double the size of the country peacefully and almost no cost, the enormous achievement for for any president. any president would want that on the rÉsume. so is jefferson a high impact president. if he had not been there, w
MSNBC
Dec 26, 2012 6:00am PST
there is this lack of modern scholarly study of jefferson. look at john adams. that got more attention and more focus. but jefferson has been this -- is it that too many folks don't want to touch the slavery issue and touch sally hemmings? what do you make of it? >> the focus has largely been on the issues of race whether it's sale hemmings, as you say, or slavery. the failures to use these forms of political scales to pursue the course. as a young man he pursued. on four or five occasions in 1784, he tried to reform slavery. he lost decisively. we know two things politicians hate most are losing publicly and decisively. >> their personal rejections. linger longer with politicians than any other and they overreact to how they lost something early. >> you can say a politician is thin skinned is to be redundant. there was this wave of vendration after he and adams died on the same day. they used him in a run up to the civil war and lincoln used him to articulate the experience of the human equality saying the honor to jefferson. fdr needed him wonderfully. i love the story abou
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:15pm EST
. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for the big day. another thing that takes place on inauguration morning and this will happen again is a religious service when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago from where we were staying there was a church called the first church that's a traditional african-american church and that's where the inaugurati
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:32pm EST
chief justice, john marshall. he had a bit of luck. john adams wanted to appoint john jay. he had been the first chief justice. rather than going off to new york, there was the time of his ascendancy, and he says, do this again. and john jay says, are you kidding? the supreme court is never going to amount to anything. john adams brings out letter into him and he is crestfallen. he looks at his secretary of state, john marshall, and says, i guess i have to nominate you. [laughter] i'm not saying that someone else might not have been nominated if they had been the one to bring in the letter. [laughter] in the grant administration corruption was rife. the first five nominees by grant put forward all seem to be involved in some activity or another. finally, grant says, who was that lawyer and introduced me when i was taken the train across ohio? and they go back and checked and it is somebody named morrison wait. and he said, i liked him. let's nominate him. [laughter] he was described as being in the top tier of the third tier of lawyers in ohio. and frankly, he served quite well as the
CBS
Dec 31, 2012 6:00pm EST
. slaves traveled around they ran errands they went from plantation to plantation word of mouth. john adams if in colonial times mentioned the incredible intelligence network that african-americans seemed to v the grapevine that carried news from far and wide in the plantations plantation south, and it actually operated as well during this time period. so from hearing about things carrying the word forth they definitely knew about it. >> suarez: one thing the emancipation proclamation didn't do was free enslaved people legally owned in the united states in kentucky in maryland, in west virginia. did the owners in those places know that the institution's days were number even though they were still part of the union? >> well they certainly feared it. southerners in the deep south and in the border states understood that when lincoln and republicans moved to stop the halt of slavery, the expansion of slavery in a way it was the death knell slavery was an expansionist institution. so to say you were going to leave slavely in place in the places it was was another way of saying it could no grow. a
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm PST
think this, you know, weirdly my head is going back to a scene in john adams which i directed where adams and jefferson are kind of, you know, arguing about two different political worldviews. one is to say that all human beings are perfectable and therefore we need a society that reflects the fact that all human beings are capable of redemption. and the other worldview is that human beings are weak and evil and vicious which is -- and we need a strong state that going to control and manage these failings. so out of these two springs the whole history of american politics, springs. and this is what you see in those two. he is a pessimist, he believes this man has fallen and can never be redeemed. that he can never be forgiven whereas valjean having inspired in his faith by the bishop, not only believes in the perfect ability of people, but he has done an extraordinary transformation himself. so his worldview is compassionate. the other's worldview sun forgiving. and what obsesses him is the the terrible grinds of gears when he comes up against this guy. because he feels that this gu
PBS
Dec 31, 2012 3:00pm PST
around, they ran errands, they went from plantation to plantation, word of mouth. john adams if in colonial times mentioned the incredible intelligence network that african-americans seemed to v the grapevine that carried news from far and wide in the plantations, plantation south, and it actually operated as well during this time period. so from hearing about things, carrying the word forth, they definitely knew about it. >> suarez: one thing the emancipation proclamation didn't do was free enslaved people legally owned in the united states, in kentucky, in maryland, in west virginia. did the owners in those places know that the institution's days were number even though they were still part of the union? >> well, they certainly feared it. southerners in the deep south and in the border states understood that when lincoln and republicans moved to stop the halt of slavery, the expansion of slavery, in a way it was the death knell, slavery was an expansionist institution. so to say you were going to leave slavely in place in the places it was was another way of saying it could no gr
MSNBC
Nov 30, 2012 4:00pm PST
are great about that guy and you're doing what david did for john adams. >> i hope so. >> david eisenhower, evan thomas, the new book is called "ike's bluff." post world war ii history, it's the best. anyway, we'll be right back. okay, now here's our holiday gift list. aww, not the mall. well, i'll do the shopping... if you do the shipping. shipping's a hassle. i'll go to the mall. hey. hi. y'know, holiday shipping's easy with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. yeah, i know. oh, you're good. [ laughing ] good luck! [ male announcer ] priority mail flat rate boxes. online pricing starts at $5.15. only from the postal service. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ wanted to provide better employee benefits while balancing the company's bottom line, their very first word was... [ to the tune of "lullaby and good night" ] ♪ af-lac ♪ aflac [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ...forbusiness.com. [ yawning sound ] >
MSNBC
Dec 3, 2012 3:00am PST
washington. barnicle did it. and you can tell. >> he was a good guy. >> and john adams, barnicle wrote a couple columns about him back in the day. >> and his son. i knew his son when his son was in day care. >> john w. adams. yeah. but i think it's his renaissance question. and then i think also he representeds the best of us and the worst of us. and i think people, when we're being honest with ourselves, we all know we have our hypocrisies, and we have our contradictions. and the fact that someone who had such evident contradictions is still worth paying attention to i think resonates. >> and there's some contention over the weekend about how great a man thomas jefferson is. we're going to talk about that a little bit later. >>> but we've got big news this morning. four weeks from today is new year's eve when the fiscal cliff comes. lawmakers now have less than a month to compromise and to avoid a year-end deadline that would trigger massive spending cuts and tax hikes for just about everybody. behind-the-scenes negotiations at a stalemate. both sides went public yesterday on th
CBS
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm PST
might contain evidence or more importantly a clue as to motive. >> john, investigators believe adam lanza, the shooter here smashed these two computers at his home. what more do we know about that. >> reporter: so he damaged the computers and the hard drives and the fbi's computary sis dance response team is going to look at those hard drives, damaged as they are, and try to determine if they can extract data from them f they can put them back together and communicate with them, they would like to mirror those hard drives and extract everything that son this computer. they are looking for two things. one they are looking for internal saved documents that might contain the planning for in massacre, lists of things and supplies you needed to get. magazines, ammunition, second, the communications, where did he order these things from, were they mail order, were they through e-mail communications and so on. but anything that's going to give them a window into it. the fact that he damaged the computers is a signal to them that there is something in there they need to see. >> john miller
MSNBC
Dec 10, 2012 3:00am PST
thinking. i said, well, mike barnicle is john adams. >> right, he is. >> a little taller but just as grumpy. >> and i knew him. >> he knew him. >> willie geist, hamilton because, let's face it, most likely to be shot in jersey. >> that's true. >> yes. >> scarborough, commanding george washington. >> washingtonesque. >> tall. >> yes. >> dignity. >> same, 6'4", same thing, yeah. >> so clearly, it's mika brzezinski. >> really? >> when i left, they're still clapping. >> really? >> renaissance woman. >> is it the alcohol? >> i think it's more of the slaves, actually. >> the what? >> nothing. i didn't say anything. >> gotcha. >> you missed that. >> i did. >> the you're the jeffersonian. >> the art of power. the art of navigating power. >> with that, let's go to the most jeffersonian figure for the news. >> all right. we begin this morning with new urgency in the fiscal cliff negotiations with now just 21 days to reach a deal. that's three weeks. today president obama returns to campaign mode, taking his fiscal cliff message to detroit. yesterday the president and speaker boehner met pri
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 5:00pm EST
b. hayes. and in 1888, benjamin harrison guest: 1824, it was john quincy adams over a andrew jackson. it was controversial and went into the house of representatives and they selected john adams. host: what is the history of this when there was not so much severity between the electoral vote and the part of a vote? guest: history shows the people guest: the history shows people were outramed but went on through their lives and we had a president. it's amazing in 2000 everyone accepted the outcough the election because it wept to the supreme court, 5-4 decision, selected president bush and it was a period of time where we went on and he governed and people accepted that. it's a form of democracy we have and it has a certain amount of stability this institution. that's another positive aspect of it. host: ben is our next caller in turlock, california, republican line. good morning, ben. caller: my question was, first of all, to get in the studies of presidential studies and you're the director, are you part of electoral college? and the other thing is, is the electoral college specific
FOX Business
Dec 27, 2012 12:00am EST
d.c. john boehner, come on. adam: won't you come home, john boehner, won't you come home. >> these guys are off in their districts, hawaii, sipping my ties with melissa francis. adam: she is in south florida. >> let's get back to work. adam: check this out. this is the world's longest high-speed rail line which stretches 1400 miles in china. takes passengers from beijing, to, i can't say that name. thank you. me and pronounciations. i can barely get shapiro right. before the train existed the travel time was twrept hours between the two cities. now it only takes eight hours. will we ever see something like this in the united states? julie, do we need it? is it relevant for high-speed rail in the united states? >> for those of us who ride the corridor for every stuck up. adam: faster sometimes to go on the regular train. >> i love this. apparently if we had the high-speed rail, new york to d.c., god knows why you want to go to d.c. under hour which i love. americans love their cars. adam: bingo. >> china doesn't have competitive airline industry. we've got rival airlines that make i
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
exclusion for religious principles. the longer john adams lived, the shorter grew his creed. in the end, it was unitarianism. jefferson wrote those ringing words of the declaration, but jefferson was a utilitarian when he urged his nephew to inquire into the truth of christianity. "if it ends in a belief that there is no god, you'll find virtue in the comforts and pleasantness you feel in virtue's exercise." james madison always explained away religion as an innate appetite. the mind, he said, prefers the idea of the self existing clause to an infinite series of cause and effect. even the founders who were unbelievers considered it a civic duty in public service to be observant unbelievers. two days after jefferson wrote his famous letter endorsing a wall of separation between church and state, he attended church services in the house of representatives. services were also held at the treasury department. jefferson and other founders made statements like accommodations for the public's strong preference for religion to enjoy ample space in the public square. they understood that christi
MSNBC
Dec 30, 2012 7:00am PST
john quincy adams who would not rest until slavery was extinguished in the country. >> yeah. the gop was running candidates that just made stuff up. congresswoman, the founders were slave owners and john quincy adams, not a founder. yes, it seemingly reached a mass of election ridiculousness in 2011. the fun was just beginning. no sooner had we cracked over the 2012 calendar than rick santorum dropped this race bait into the political waters in january. >> i don't want to make people's lives better by giving them somebody else's money. >> oh, blah -- right? hearing it once was hilarious enough. even better trying to make us think we didn't hear what we heard. >> i started to say a word and sort of bla -- >> all over the place, didn't you. unfortunately, for rick santorum, the election mounted to a failed attempt to reset the google search of his last name. sorry rick, the redefinition campaign is still number one. but, santorum is not alone among candidates burdened with a google legacy. newt gingrich assured his name will be forever linked in the predictive search with the phrase mo
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